Nest #3955

Nickname: Griffins Beach
Nest substrate: Live Tree
Nest Location Description: New Jersey Osprey Nest Platform
Nest Cam URL:
Monitoring Groups: Chesapeake Bay Osprey Watchers
Latitude: 37.1564864297725
Longitude: -76.3882571730858
Followers: None

Past Seasons

Show reports, diaries, and photos from:Current 2019 2014 2013

Activity reports

2013 Nest Activity Report by Roxanne
Adult arrival 03/15/2013 Nestlings 2
Nest Occupied Yes Fledglings
Nest Active Yes First chick fledging
Egg laying Chicks last observed
Incubation initiation Nest failure
Clutch hatching Reason for nest failure
2014 Nest Activity Report by Roxanne
Adult arrival 03/15/2015 Nestlings
Nest Occupied Yes Fledglings
Nest Active   First chick fledging
Egg laying Chicks last observed
Incubation initiation Nest failure
Clutch hatching Reason for nest failure
2019 Nest Activity Report by Roxanne
Adult arrival 03/20/2019 Nestlings
Nest Occupied Yes Fledglings
Nest Active   First chick fledging
Egg laying Chicks last observed
Incubation initiation Nest failure
Clutch hatching Reason for nest failure

Photos of this nest

Nesting Diaries

05/27/2013 by Roxanne
We knew we had fledlings but because of the depth and orientation of the nest, we were unable to see them. High winds this week also kept everyone hunkered down in the nest. Mother has been feeding for four days. Today we saw two, and possibly a third chick.

04/20/2013 by Roxanne
Griffins Beach in Poquoson has had an osprey nests for many years. The earlier nests were platforms on top of spar poles on the beach’s sand bars. Several nests were put in place by George Hartman and Steve Corneliussen using a water drill. Storms and winter ice heaving took their toll on these nests. Hurricane Isabel in 2003 took out the last sand bar nest. We had one pine tree left standing in the area after Isabel. The ospreys built a nest the next summer in the pine tree. The wind continually tried to take the nest down. They managed to raise a baby. The next spring, our neighbor Don Tenpas built a nest platform for the pine tree. He and his wife Barbara had a tree service install it in the top of the tree to give the ospreys a proper nesting platform. In the 2011 season, our pair produced the first set of three chicks. To our horror, on July 4, a fierce storm blew one the chicks out of the nest. Its leg caught a piece of sea grass and it hung upside down for almost a minute before falling to the ground. Thankfully it survived the fall. Newport News Animal Control took possession and turned it over to a private raptor rescue in Virginia Beach. It was released in the area later that summer. Sadly our pine tree also lost the “landing limb” during that storm. Many chicks had used it to learn to fly from and land on. The remaining pair had to be carrier deck landing pilots from the start that summer. During the winter of 2011-12, the nest collapsed like a ring round the tree. Jim Todt built a new nest using the New Jersey Nest Platform plan. It was put atop the pine tree on March 15, 2012. One of the perch poles was installed out of alignment because of an approaching thunderstorm. Our osprey pair again produced three chicks that made it to maturity. The perch pole is frequently utilized by the parents.